Saying thanks when hard work paid off

The books in the Frank Nagler Mystery Series are each deserving of the awards they have recieved, they are compelling and masterfully crafted. We at Imzadi Publishing feel privileged to work with Mr. Daigle and look forward to the next installment in this series. If you haven’t read a Frank Nagler Mystery yet these are sure to satisfy craving for a good crime novel and are available in print or ebook today!

Michael Stephen Daigle

The hardest part of writing at times is knowing too much.

In the case of THE RED HAND, the Frank Nagler Mystery series prequel, that was surely the case. I had written three books about Frank Nagler, Ironton. N.J., and set out to write the fourth.

I had a choice – Go forward, or go back and examine the story from the beginning.

I went back, deciding answering questions about the past would help the series move forward.

That’s went it got hard.

I knew too much about Frank and the town and the story that needed to be told.

And it showed up in the writing, which was flat, predictable and boring.

There is this: If as a writer you are bored with what you are putting on paper, the reader will be, too.

So, I started over by beginning the story in the middle.

It worked.

It gave…

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“The Weight of Living” named Distinguished Favorite in NYC Big Book Award contest

Wonderful news for this very deserving author! We couldn’t be happier for him!

Michael Stephen Daigle

“The Weight of Living,” the award-winning Frank Nagler Mystery,  has been named a Distinguished Favorite in New York City Big Book Award contest.

Thank you the New York City Big Book Award judges.

This is the fourth award in 2017-18 for this book.

“The Weight of Living” (2017) is the third book in the series. It is complex, thrilling and moving.

The story: A young girl is found in a grocery store Dumpster on a cold March night wearing just shorts and a tank top. She does not speak to either Detective Frank Nagler, the social worker called to the scene, or later to a nun, who is an old friend of Nagler’s.

What appears to be a routine search for the girl’s family turns into a generational hell that drags Nagler into an examination of a decades old death of a another young girl, and the multi-state crime enterprise…

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