Another 5-Star review for ‘The Weight of Living.’ Thanks from a grateful author | Michael Stephen Daigle

https://michaelstephendaigle.com/2019/02/13/another-5-star-review-for-the-wright-of-living-thanks-from-a-grateful-author/

Why writing a first draft is like performing stand-up with hecklers

This was so much fun to read!

Michael Stephen Daigle

“She…”

Who’s that?

What?

Who’s she?

The woman in the story. I don’t know. I haven’t named her yet.

How are we supposed to like her if she hasn’t got a name?

How do you know you’re supposed to like her? Maybe she’s a thief.

Is she going to be a thief?

Possibly. Maybe I want to save that detail as a surprise to the reader.

Readers don’t like surprises.

Um, “Marylyn…”

That’s a weird spelling.

“Alright. “Marilyn…”

No. Too Marilyn Monroe-ish.

What?

You’ll need a male character who looks like Clark Gable.

I’m not writing a 1950s black-and-white movie.

Nice hyphens.

Look, I’ll call her George or Bill. It disguises her sexuality.

Oh, how au currant.

Could I just write something?!

Sure. Go head. We’ll wait.

Alright. “She banged her head…”

Name!

“George banged her head on the locked front door glass when she realized she had left her…

View original post 433 more words

“The Weight of Living” named Distinguished Favorite in NYC Big Book Award contest

Wonderful news for this very deserving author! We couldn’t be happier for him!

Michael Stephen Daigle

“The Weight of Living,” the award-winning Frank Nagler Mystery,  has been named a Distinguished Favorite in New York City Big Book Award contest.

Thank you the New York City Big Book Award judges.

This is the fourth award in 2017-18 for this book.

“The Weight of Living” (2017) is the third book in the series. It is complex, thrilling and moving.

The story: A young girl is found in a grocery store Dumpster on a cold March night wearing just shorts and a tank top. She does not speak to either Detective Frank Nagler, the social worker called to the scene, or later to a nun, who is an old friend of Nagler’s.

What appears to be a routine search for the girl’s family turns into a generational hell that drags Nagler into an examination of a decades old death of a another young girl, and the multi-state crime enterprise…

View original post 361 more words